EU drowned in the Indo Pacific

EU drowned in the Indo Pacific

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Taking into account the EU’s previous experience with multilateral agreements, it is likely that there will be an emphasis on tariff regulation for goods and services, including the General Scheme of Preferences, which is already in force for a number of countries. Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the Philippines are already cooperating with the EU under the GSP + agreement (which focuses on sustainable development and governance). The EU does not hide its intention to conclude trade deals with Australia and New Zealand, which, according to Samuel Huntington’s civilization scheme, belong to the Western bloc.

AUKUS and the Future of NATO Image © The Radical Outlook

By Leonid Savin

© The Radical Outlook

On September 16, the European Commission published the EU Indo-Pacific Cooperation Strategy. Earlier, on April 19, the EU already announced its interest in this area, noting that the community is interested in strengthening its involvement in the Indo-Pacific, in connection with which approaches and principles for interaction will be developed.

Rational factors

The document says that the future of the EU and the Indo-Pacific region is inextricably linked, given the interdependence of economies and common global challenges. The region includes seven G20 members – Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the Republic of South Africa – as well as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), which is becoming an increasingly important partner for the EU. The region is home to three-fifths of the world’s population, produces 60% of global GDP, accounts for two-thirds of pre-pandemic global economic growth, and is at the forefront of the digital economy. The EU’s most remote regions and overseas countries and territories constitutionally bound to its member states are an important part of the EU’s approach to the Indo-Pacific region.

Also, the Brussels bureaucrats included in the Strategy and the green agenda, indicating in the first paragraph that“The Indo-Pacific region is both an important source of global environmental problems and a potential beneficiary of their solution. The region’s share of global carbon dioxide emissions has grown from 37% to 57% since 2000, and the region will account for more than 70% of the growth in global demand for energy by 2030. Climate change is expected to further increase pressure on marine biodiversity, natural resources, and fish stocks, leading to changes in ecosystem dynamics The Indo-Pacific region includes a number of marine biodiversity hotspots such as the Coral Triangle, which accounts for 76% of all coral species in the world and supports 120 million people living in the area. The South China Sea alone accounts for about 12% of the world’s fish catch and hosts more than half of the world’s fishing vessels. The region is therefore vital to mitigate the effects of climate change and protect our planet’s fragile ecological balance. “

Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the Philippines are already cooperating with the EU under the GSP + agreement (which focuses on sustainable development and governance). The EU does not hide its intention to conclude trade deals with Australia and New Zealand, which, according to Samuel Huntington’s civilization scheme, belong to the Western bloc. On a special account and India, negotiations with which have already begun this year. On June 9, 2021, the European Parliament and the Council of Europe launched The Neighborhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – Global Europe.

This is followed by a clear attack on China.

Likewise, efforts to create a global level playing field based on transparent trade rules are increasingly undermined by unfair trade practices and economic coercion. These developments exacerbate tensions in trade, value and value chains. The COVID-19 pandemic has tested the resilience of economies, further highlighted the interdependence of EU and Indo-Pacific partners, and stressed that both sides gain resilience through open, diversified and undistorted access to global markets. Finally, the ongoing crisis in Afghanistan also demonstrates the direct impact that events in the region have on the security of Europe. ” are increasingly undermined by unfair trade practices and economic coercion. These developments exacerbate tensions in trade, value and value chains. The COVID-19 pandemic has tested the resilience of economies, further highlighted the interdependence of EU and Indo-Pacific partners, and stressed that both sides gain resilience through open, diversified and undistorted access to global markets. Finally, the ongoing crisis in Afghanistan also demonstrates the direct impact that events in the region have on the security of Europe. ” are increasingly undermined by unfair trade practices and economic coercion. These developments exacerbate tensions in trade, value and value chains. The COVID-19 pandemic has tested the resilience of economies, further exposed the interdependence of the EU and Indo-Pacific partners, and stressed that both sides gain resilience through open, diversified and undistorted access to global markets. Finally, the ongoing crisis in Afghanistan also demonstrates the direct impact that events in the region have on European security. ” further highlighted the interdependence of the EU and Indo-Pacific partners and emphasized that both sides gain resilience through open, diversified and undistorted access to global markets. Finally, the ongoing crisis in Afghanistan also demonstrates the direct impact that events in the region have on European security. ” further highlighted the interdependence of the EU and Indo-Pacific partners and emphasized that both sides gain resilience through open, diversified and undistorted access to global markets. Finally, the ongoing crisis in Afghanistan also demonstrates the direct impact that events in the region have on European security. “

West-centric liberalism

Based on these factors, the EU declares the need to strengthen its cooperation with partners in the region in order to “promote an international order based on rules . ” With this phrase, the EU bureaucrats make it clear that they are following in the wake of Washington, where they constantly point to some kind of international order based not on laws and agreements, but on rules that the collective West is trying to impose on the rest of the world.

The EU’s Planned Action List identifies the need to complete negotiations with Australia, Indonesia, and New Zealand on trade issues, negotiate investment with India, complete negotiations with East African countries, possibly resume trade negotiations with Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand, and ultimately, negotiations on a trade agreement between the regions with ASEAN. Possible agreements with Malaysia, Thailand, and the Maldives appear, as well as the conclusion of green alliances and agreements with Australia, and New Zealand.

These will be the principles on which the EU will build its long-term strategy in Asia.

It is stated that the EU will:

– Strengthen and protect a rules-based international order by promoting comprehensive and effective multilateral cooperation based on shared values ​​and principles, including a commitment to respect for democracy, human rights and the rule of law; – Promote a level playing field and an open and fair environment for trade and investment; – Contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), address climate change and environmental degradation on land and in the ocean, and support sustainable and inclusive socio-economic development; – Participate in bilateral and multilateral cooperation with partners to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD);

– Support truly inclusive policy-making and collaboration that takes into account the views of civil society, the private sector, social partners and other key stakeholders; – Establish mutually beneficial trade and economic relations with the region that promote inclusive economic growth and stability, as well as facilitate and facilitate communication; – Participate in the region as a partner in our efforts to raise awareness of the impact of global demographic trends.

Practical implementation

Taking into account the EU’s previous experience with multilateral agreements, it is likely that there will be an emphasis on tariff regulation for goods and services, including the General Scheme of Preferences, which is already in force for a number of countries. Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the Philippines are already cooperating with the EU under the GSP + agreement (which focuses on sustainable development and governance). The EU does not hide its intention to conclude trade deals with Australia and New Zealand, which, according to Samuel Huntington’s civilization scheme, belong to the Western bloc. On a special account and India, negotiations with which have already begun this year. On June 9, 2021, the European Parliament and the Council of Europe launched The Neighborhood, Development, and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – Global Europe.

In addition, the EU intends to conclude digital partnership agreements with key players such as Japan, South Korea and Singapore. With them, it is supposed to work out the initial model and then extend it to other countries.

Since China practically does not appear among these and potential partners (it is only mentioned within the framework of the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and as a subject of conflicts), it can be concluded that the EU will clearly strengthen its presence in opposition to China, especially if we take into account the designated stake on “international rules-based order “and the desire to deploy naval forces to ensure freedom of navigation. Such actions on the part of the United States have so far only led to increased tensions and increased risks in the South China Sea and around Taiwan. 

In the field of education, the Erasmus + program will be applied. In terms of security, the experience of the navies of the EU NAVFOR countries in various missions will be expanded from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific. The EU will try to consolidate its presence in the South Pacific under the guise of fighting pirates, smugglers and drug trafficking. The EU also has a project called Enhancing Security Cooperation in and with Asia (ESIWA), where pilot partners are India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Singapore and Vietnam. Military experts from EU countries have already been deployed in Indonesia and Vietnam.

The EU’s Planned Action List identifies the need to complete negotiations with Australia, Indonesia, and New Zealand on trade issues, negotiate investment with India, complete negotiations with East African countries, possibly resume trade negotiations with Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand, and ultimately, negotiations on a trade agreement between the regions with ASEAN. Possible agreements with Malaysia, Thailand, and the Maldives appear, as well as the conclusion of green alliances and agreements with Australia, and New Zealand.

Singapore, Korea and Japan are listed as like-minded countries that can be connected to the Horizon Europe program. Japan and India are noted as important partners in establishing ties with the region. Finally, it said about the need to ” explore ways to ensure the expanded deployment of naval forces by EU member states to help protect sea lines of communication and freedom of navigation in the Indo-Pacific region, while increasing the capacity of partners in the Indo-Pacific region to ensure maritime security.” …

Since China practically does not appear among these and potential partners (it is only mentioned within the framework of the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and as a subject of conflicts), it can be concluded that the EU will clearly strengthen its presence in opposition to China, especially if we take into account the designated stake on “international rules-based order “and the desire to deploy naval forces to ensure freedom of navigation. Such actions on the part of the United States have so far only led to increased tensions and increased risks in the South China Sea and around Taiwan. The EU clearly wants to step on the same rake.

Finally, the new strategy clearly shows the spirit of neo-colonialism, even if it is veiled by phrases about cooperation and equality.


Author

Leonid Savin is a Russian geopolitical Expert and the deputy head chief of the International Eurasia Movement


Republishing is allowed with a copyright credit to © The Radical Outlook

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The Radical Outlook

The Radical Outlook is an online news web Portal designed for in-depth news analysis from the Eurasian region and beyond. It is Founded by a geopolitical analyst Shahzada Rahim.
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